The following dataset includes fluency, speech and language variables from conversations with 60 children who do and do not stutter. These conversations took place with a clinician in the home and with a parent on campus at the Vanderbilt Medical Center. During the two visits, standardized speech and language tests were administered to the children, and parents were given several questionnaires to complete. Data definitions and a brief description of the data are also provided.

          The Developmental Stuttering Project (DSP) is a 5-year longitudinal study sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The primary investigator (PI) for this project is Dr. Tedra Walden, a Professor in the Psychology and Human Development Department and Hearing and Speech Sciences Department at Vanderbilt University. Her main collaborator is Dr. Robin Jones, an Assistant Professor in the Hearing and Speech Sciences Department at Vanderbilt University. The goal of the project is to learn more about the linguistic, emotional, and physiological contributions to developmental stuttering. Developmental stuttering accounts for the vast majority of stuttering cases, and typically begins around the age of 3. The specific reasons for its onset are not well understood. It is expected that the data from this study will aid in understanding this disorder. The data in this dataset are from the first occasion of measurement. Data definitions and a brief description of the data are also provided.